‘I’m almost not creating, but transcribing the feelings the music gives me’ – KM Weiland, The Undercover Soundtrack

My guest on The Undercover Soundtrack this week claims not to be musical in the slightest, but ‘endlessly fascinated by the power music has to tell perfect stories’. She is KM Weiland and she’s talking about the aggressive, dreamy soundtrack that beat, thudded and swelled behind her medieval novel Behold the Dawn. Join me at the red blog

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  1. #1 by Rich Weatherly on February 29, 2012 - 12:07 am

    I’m quite fond of Ms. Weiland’s writing and have read several of her works. I find music giving me the visuals and pacing I need for a particular scene, even to the point of establishing the primary tone. This is especially true when I’m writing poetry.

    I see visions and hear words that otherwise do not exist.

    • #2 by rozmorris @dirtywhitecandy on February 29, 2012 - 12:14 am

      Hello Rich – that is a fantastic way of putting it. In fact, you make me want to put music on and immerse right now.

      • #3 by Rich Weatherly on February 29, 2012 - 12:24 am

        Thank you Roz. There’s a poem on my blog, dedicated to Inspiration from a Scottish Fantasy
        by Anton Bruch **. I wrote it in one sitting.
        More, ** The Scottish Fantasy by Anton Bruch is a nostalgic orchestral piece with stirring violin accompaniment.
        It is a symphonic adaptation of melodies taken from traditional Scottish folk tunes.

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